Stereotypes in the Sociology of Ali Al-Wardi: Its Origination and Relics

  • Nadim Jawad Kazem College of Arts /University of Babylon
  • Hisham Adel Hartah College of Arts /University of Babylon
Keywords: template, pattern, stereotype, Stereotype template

Abstract

This research has been taken out of master's thesis submilted by (Hisham Adel Hartah) entitled "Stereotypes on Religious and Ethnic Minorities in the Middle and Southern Euphrates Provinces of Iraq Field social study To the college of Arts, Department of Sociology, University of Babylon,Under the guidance  of Assistant Professor Dr. (NazemJawadKazem) "

     Dr. Ali Al-Wardi (1913-1995) is an Iraqi sociologist, an Iraqi mind producer of prolific and innovative works of enlightened societal ideas. He was passionate about the stereotypes he had been inspired by his community since childhood, and the cognitive and intellectual value he had acquired through his studies, His community, believes Dr. Ali al-Wardi that the human mind is subject to psychological, social and cultural constraints, these limitations indicate that the mind is a social product and that the facts possessed by this mind and defend it are not absolute facts, but are the results of the process of social preparation that seeks to standardize and molding human thought.

The results of this study are: 1- Reason is the product of a social constellation. In other words, the mind of man grows only within the limits of the mold that society makes for him. And the idea that is wrong in your opinion may be true in the eyes of others because it sees the perspective imposed by the community or imposed by his own interest or psychological complex.

For this reason people were interested in  stereotypes in sociology Dr. Ali Al-Wardi and how it originated, and its positive and negative effects.

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Published
2019-04-07
How to Cite
[1]
N. J. Kazem and H. A. Hartah, “Stereotypes in the Sociology of Ali Al-Wardi: Its Origination and Relics”, JUBH, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 497 - 512, Apr. 2019.
Section
Articles